/hex0.jpg
/hex0.jpg
/hex0.jpg
/hex1.jpg
/hex1.jpg
/hex1.jpg
/hex2.jpg
/hex2.jpg
/hex2.jpg
/hex3.jpg
/hex3.jpg
/hex3.jpg
/hex4.jpg
/hex4.jpg
/hex4.jpg
/hex5.jpg
/hex5.jpg
/hex5.jpg
/hex6.jpg
/hex6.jpg
/hex6.jpg
/hex7.jpg
/hex7.jpg
/hex7.jpg
/hex8.jpg
/hex8.jpg
/hex8.jpg
/hex9.jpg
Fused glass is glass that’s been melted together or formed over molds and objects in a kiln.  Forming the glass over molds is called “slumping”.  The effect you get depends upon how hot you heat the glass and the time that it’s exposed to the heat.  Lower temperatures will fuse the glass pieces into a single piece while maintaining sculptural details while higher temperatures will melt the glass pieces into a flatter piece with less raised detail.  Most of my work is done at between 1300F and 1500F.Most of my fused pieces are matted and framed, and sometimes I incorporate bronze, copper or steel into the design.  But it’s quite possible to set the fused glass in mortar or cement, just as you would do with ceramic tile.  This works well if you want a decorative, sculptural “tile” border or a surround for a fireplace.  The glass can be bent or slumped over molds to make curved light fixtures, vessels or other shapes.I like to use glass made by Bullseye, Oroboros and Desag (GNA) as these glasses have good characteristic for fusing and slumping and are available in a wide range of textures, colors and surface patterns.  But the red you see in these pieces was made by Wasser:  it fires to a true blood red and I’m pleased that it will soon be available again.Thanks to Knoblauch Studios and Resh Framing Shop, both of Danville, Illinois for photography of some difficult subjects and for cutting matts and backers with skill and patience.
 
Click on an image for a larger photo.